Morgan Dawson

Morgan Dawson

Morgan Dawson, RN, CCRN

CICU
Vidant Medical Center
Greenville, North Carolina
United States
Morgan immediately switched gears and informed the Interdisciplinary Treatment Team of the change of decision.

Morgan Dawson continuously incorporates chaplains into the provision of care for patients and their families. One such collaboration occurred in January when a patient, for which Morgan was the Primary RN, was at end of life.

Upon assessing the patient, Morgan immediately paged the On-call Chaplain and requested a Chaplain for the support of the patient and family. Since the Unit Chaplain was a Chaplain Resident and was not available due to education requirements, I responded as the Lead Cardiac Chaplain. Upon my arrival, Morgan welcomed me and then affirmed me, as the Chaplain, to the family. Throughout the day that was filled with very emotionally packed and protracted encounters with the patient and family, Morgan included me, as the spiritual provider, in every aspect of the provision of care and support.

With a seamless fabric of teamwork, Morgan would enter and inform the family of what was transpiring with the patient. I would then provide support for the family based upon information that Morgan had provided. When Morgan received information, she immediately provided me with the update and vice versa.

After a Physician-Family Conference, in which the eldest son made a decision that was contrary to what the Interdisciplinary Team believed to be in the best interest of the patient, Morgan engaged me to devise a plan of how best to support the family in their decision, while still providing optimum care to the patient. While Morgan and I were collaborating to devise a nursing and spiritual plan of support, the eldest son exited the patient’s room and informed us of having reversed the previous decision and stated instructions for the patient to transition to comfort care.

Morgan immediately switched gears and informed the Interdisciplinary Treatment Team of the change of decision. I, too, switched approaches and began supporting the family in their anticipatory grief. Still working in tandem, Morgan and I collaborated as a team to best meet the needs of the patient and family as comfort care measures were implemented. She and I stood with the family as Morgan, RCP, extubated the patient, asked if the family had immediate needs for which we could provide support, and then exited to allow the family private, quality time with the patient.

Morgan and I continued to plan a strategy of approach for when the patient died. When that time came, Morgan informed the physician, and we entered the room as a team for the physician to inform the family. Morgan continued to collaborate with me, as the Chaplain, for the bereavement support of the family. Each family member sought out both Morgan and me to express appreciation for the care and support that was provided to the patient and family.

This account is this Chaplain’s continual experience of working with Morgan, RN. She is the epitome of and an exemplary model of the qualities of the DAISY Award.