Kim Coppin

Kim Coppin

Kim Coppin, BSN, RN

Behavioral Health
Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
Chicago, Illinois
United States

We had a patient on our unit that transferred from MICCU in 4 point restraints and a mask covering his face (the patient was previously on 631 where he was found unresponsive and an RRT was called). Our report was that the patient was very aggressive, kicked the staff and was spitting. The patient had been given several medications to treat his agitation with no relief. After the patient was transferred safely into bed, his nurse removed his mask, feeling sorry for him. The patient was pleading for scissors to remove the restraints, but we did not because we were afraid. The patient was very aggressive and using foul language. Shortly thereafter, this angel, Kim came down. She came to check on the patient because she was familiar with him and concerned about his well being. She hated to see him in restraints. After discussing with the nurse and charge nurse her concerns, we decided to remove the restraints. Kim let us know that the patient was a schizophrenic who was normally very calm and pleasant in disposition but frequently used bad words. Kim told us that if you remind the patient to calm down and not to use that language, he could be easily redirected. Kim made the staff here on 671 feel comfortable and safe to remove the restraints. She believed his behavior was only worsened by this. With Kim by our side, we removed all the restraints. The patient was walked to the restroom and then sat in a chair and given something to drink. After several minutes, the patient stated he was tired and wanted to sleep. The patient was assisted to bed and fell asleep immediately, getting the rest he greatly needed. The next day, the patient was safely discharged back to his nursing home without incident. Had Kim not come to our rescue, who knows how long the patient would have stayed here or what kind of outcome would have been the result. To Kim! Thank you! The world needs more nurses like you and we need more education as nurses for our ever increasing psych population.